Featured Speakers

The ENY ACS and NERM 2019 are proud to present Joachim Frank as our Plenary Speaker.

Joachim Frank - 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Joachim Frank - 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Joachim Frank is a Professor of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and a Professor of the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from the Technical University in Munich and, in 1975, joined the Wadsworth Center in Albany as a Senior Research Scientist and, in 1985, joined the faculty of the Department of Biomedical Sciences in the newly founded School of Public Health of SUNY Albany. In 2008 he moved to New York to assume his current positions. Dr. Frank’s lab has developed techniques of electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction of biological macromolecules. He has applied this technique of visualization to explore the structure and dynamics of the ribosome during the process of protein synthesis.

Dr. Frank is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Microbiology. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was recently honored for his contributions to the development of cryogenic electron microscopy of biological molecules and the study of protein synthesis with the 2014 Franklin Medal for Life Science. In 2017 he shared the Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences with Richard Henderson and Marin van Heel, and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Richard Henderson and Jacques Dubochet.

Speakers of the Buck-Whitney Award Symposium:

Jack H. Freed - Buck-Whitney Award 1981

Jack H. Freed - Buck-Whitney Award 1981

Jack H. Freed, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at Cornell University, was born in New York City in 1938. After graduating from Stuyvesant High School (1954), he attended Yale University, receiving the BE degree in 1958, graduating first in his class with highest honors. He pursued his graduate studies at Columbia University with Professor George K. Fraenkel and received his M.S. in 1959 and his Ph.D. in 1962.

Thomas Szyperski - Buck-Whitney Award 2003

Thomas Szyperski - Buck-Whitney Award 2003

Dr. Szyperski studied Biochemistry and Chemistry as a Fellow of the German National Academic Foundation (‘Studienstiftung’) at, respectively, the University of Tübingen and the Technical University of Munich, Germany (Diploma degree in 1988). After a visiting stay at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where research focused on Quantum Chemistry he moved in 1989 to the ETH Zürich, Switzerland, to obtain his Ph.D. (1992), for which Dr. Szyperski received the ‘Medal of the ETH’, and his Habilitation (1998) in Biological NMR / Biophysics.

Frank V. Bright - Buck-Whitney Award 1999

Frank V. Bright - Buck-Whitney Award 1999

A San Diego area native, Frank earned his B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Redlands in 1982. His Ph.D. studies, supervised by Professor Linda B. McGown, were completed at Oklahoma State University in 1985. He then carried out postdoctoral research with Professor Gary M. Hieftje at Indiana University until 1987 whereupon he joined the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY-Buffalo) Department of Chemistry as a tenure-track Assistant Professor. At Buffalo he rose through the professorial ranks and he currently holds the Henry M. Woodburn Chair and is a SUNY Distinguished Professor of Chemistry.

Benjamin J. Wiley - Buck-Whitney Award 2019

Benjamin J. Wiley - Buck-Whitney Award 2019

Benjamin J. Wiley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University. He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2003, and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle in 2007 with Professor Younan Xia. From 2007-2009, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University in the laboratory of George M. Whitesides. He joined the Department of Chemistry at Duke University as an Assistant Professor in 2009.

Stanislaus S. Wong - Buck-Whitney Award 2009

Stanislaus S. Wong - Buck-Whitney Award 2009

Stanislaus S. Wong earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1999 under the tutelage of Professor Charles M. Lieber. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University with Professor Louis E. Brus, he joined Stony Brook University with a joint appointment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and is currently Professor of Chemistry. Professor Wong was recently appointed as an Executive Editor for ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, and was formerly the section editor of the ‘Materials: synthesis and self-assembly’ section of Nanotechnology.

Womens Chemist Committee Symposium Keynote Speaker

Debra Rolison - Ph.D.

Debra Rolison - Ph.D.

Debra Rolison heads the Advanced Electrochemical Materials section at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC. Her team designs, synthesizes, characterizes, and applies three-dimensionally structured, ultraporous, multifunctional nanoarchitectures for such rate-critical applications as catalysis, energy storage and conversion, and sensors. Her 2003 article in Science emphasizing the importance of nothing in catalytic nanoarchitectures presaged the current emphasis on mesoscale effects in catalysis. Along with Bruce Dunn (UCLA), Jeffrey Long (NRL), and Henry White (University of Utah), she established a new sub-discipline in electrochemical science:  three-dimensional (3D) electrochemical energy storage in which battery function is volumetrically integrated within the cell rather than layered in 2D and all transport paths are wired in 3D.

She received a B.S. in Chemistry from Florida Atlantic University (1975) and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1980). Rolison is a Fellow of the AAAS, AWIS, MRS, and ACS. Among her major awards, she received the 2018 William H. Nichols Medal, the 2017 E.O. Hulburt Award (the top science award at the NRL), the Department of the Navy Dr. Dolores M. Etter Top Scientist & Engineer Team Award (2016), the 2014 ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Electrochemistry, the 2012 Charles N. Reilley Award of the Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry, the 2011 ACS Award in the Chemistry of Materials, and the 2011 Hillebrand Prize of the Chemical Society of Washington. She is the author of over 225 articles and holds 38 U.S. patents.

Keynote Address for Undergraduate Students

Yogesh Surendranath

Yogesh Surendranath

Yogesh (Yogi) Surendranath is the Paul M. Cook Career Development Associate Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He holds dual bachelor's degrees in chemistry and physics from the University of Virginia and a PhD in inorganic chemistry from MIT, obtained under the direction of Professor Daniel Nocera. As part of his graduate work, he investigated the mechanism oxygen evolution catalysis by oxidic cobalt-based materials. After receiving his PhD, Professor Surendranath undertook postdoctoral studies as a Miller Research Fellow at UC Berkeley, under the direction of Professor Paul Alivisatos. In the summer of 2013, he assumed his current position at MIT.